Literary events

Looking for a specialist club or group, tell us here.
User avatar
Richard
Posts: 2245
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:36 pm

Literary events

Postby Richard » Fri Jan 12, 2018 2:30 pm

Does anyone know of venues which play regular host to Literary Readings, novels, poems, for example.
I sometimes see one in a shop window but the date is usually an old one. :(
The Turkish Cafe in Queens Road had one for James Joyce 'At Ulysses' in the White Rock Hotel, Will this be a regular venue in future and when, it seems so fragmented and you have to visit the cafe's or hunt about for 'bitty' information.

User avatar
seahermit
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby seahermit » Sat Jan 13, 2018 1:50 am

Quite a lot of events bob up in Hastings but many don't last long. It's always difficult to keep the energy of a writers group going long-term, it's hit-and-miss who turns up and how committed they are, so even experienced group leaders/facilitators usually have a 50/50 success rate! I ran a group in Hastings which lasted for 18 months - reasonably good going.

The bookshop in Kings Road has book-readings and poetry sometimes (usually very keen people there and I recently went to a highly enjoyable "open mic" poetry evening).

I have posted below (copied from FB) info on a writers group at the Temperance Bar in Kings Road. No idea what it is like (the place looks slightly expensive but seems to be popular). I will probably check out the event myself shortly.

Waterstones in Priory Meadow used to have book readings, may still do, but they don't seem to be advertised anywhere except on the shop window. And Bookbuster in Queens Road also has poetry reading nights every month, but I found the place very cramped and nowhere to sit down!


Temperance Bar and Restaurant
35 Kings road, TN37 6DX , Hastings, East Sussex

The not so serious writers group.
17 January–12 September

A not so serious writing group, for those who like writing, but think the whole concept of sitting around in serious silence, while other people at the table judge your work, TERRIFYING.
Perfect for beginners and advanced writers alike.
Bring a piece of writing if you'd like some friendly advice, Discuss interesting works you've read or just come to listen and be with like minded people
Every Wednesday, 17 January – 12 September

JAN 17
Wed19:00

JAN 24
Wed19:00

JAN 31
Wed19:00

User avatar
Richard
Posts: 2245
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:36 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby Richard » Sat Jan 13, 2018 2:42 pm

Thanks MJ,

I suppose this is a fairly niche activity whereas with the music, Jazz or whatever all over the place, also with information on flyers, a little bitty, you just turn up and expect to be entertained.
It would interest me to listen to works by authors such as Shaw or Joyce being read, a pity we can't hear the author read his/her own work as that would be interesting.
Well, we can with poetry concocted by a contemporary as well as literary work of prose.
Although I am not sure exactly what 'prose' is except that the Greeks spoke poetry a lot until prose was introduced at a later date.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge jokingly requested that novice poets should know the "definitions of prose and poetry; that is, prose—words in their best order; poetry—the best words in their best order. If all novels are prose and Shakespeare' Plays were written in prose, except for the bits of verse, then I can sort of understand that.

Discussing interesting works or those you don't understand would interest me.
Some of my friends rave about stuff like Kurt Vonnegut Junior's 'Happy Birthday Wanda June' but I have to say that I find it difficult to read 'Plays' where scenes introduce various characters at the start of most lines, it doesn't flow easily and I feel there are hidden meanings (much as in Shakespeare) that requires analysis and is not always understandable at 'face value'.

Must try harder!! :)

User avatar
seahermit
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby seahermit » Sun Jan 14, 2018 5:31 pm

A few reading groups advertise from time to time but mainly for classics or more modern bestseller novels. Not seen any for the heavier stuff, certainly not Kurt Vonnegut!

If you want to discuss interesting writers of whatever genre, why not start your own reading group?! There's an idea for you, not too difficult to organise. I'd be interested, would jog me into reading works I'd missed out on, and there might be other takers - if you advertise in the right places. A flyer in the town centre near the pubs would probably not even be noticed by the fuddled passers-by!

User avatar
Richard
Posts: 2245
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:36 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby Richard » Sun Jan 14, 2018 6:32 pm

Thanks MJ, I'll certainly think about it - currently trying to get motherkins into a care home, up in Cheshire, a sensitive and time-consuming situation at the moment.
Perhaps at the Turkish Cafe, the atmosphere is ok - it could be fun.
I have seen situations where storytellers read to kids but the narrator was wooden and did not manage to make it work really.
Reading something you find meaningful or interesting, is a 'must' I guess.
Personailty is helpful or just comic dead-pan like Peter Cook(e), I've heard a few talk in a similar vein in Hastings. :)

User avatar
seahermit
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby seahermit » Sun Jan 14, 2018 7:33 pm

The Turkish cafe (Queens Road?) would be a great idea - I think you already know the owner.

I'm not sure how reading groups work but there's stuff online about it. What about setting a book/books for people to read first (or read part thereof) and then they come along and discuss .. and read out some of their favourite passages? Or bits they didn't like, for others to argue about?! Ideas .. Ideas..

User avatar
Richard
Posts: 2245
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:36 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby Richard » Sun Jan 14, 2018 9:00 pm

Discussion about a book/author and his/her attempts to express ideas, in a story that stands out as something unique or meaningful, sounds just the sort of thing to stimulate curiosity and to start like-minded people thinking, as you say, perhaps by analysing a set piece.
Or to encourage discussion from people wanting to learn more but did not know where to start.

Who knows what motivates people to write? I really do not know - some seem to have a natural inclination to express ideas from a background of bitter experience, seeing it as an opportunity to get out of finacial straits by hitting the jackpot with a 'best seller'.
Others are not bothered about financial rewards but may feel it is enough just to be able to share thoughts and ideas.
A novel has to be planned and calculated in some great detail and rewritten many times, a simple poem may also evolve and be discarded repeatedly until it seems 'finished'.
Most literary work is influenced by and copies other genres, just as in music and painting.
Trying to come up with something new to write about is a challenge, from fantasy to science fiction to works intended to address the real issues in society.
Some may be keen to see their work in print and need feedback before committing themselves, others are more confident and willing to 'print and be damned' come what may.
Most 'popular' books now seem to have dedications to friends and family 'without whose tireless help it would not have been possible'.
How does a literary work become well-known and respected anyway?
Does it even matter if it is just fantasy or action-adventure stuff if it serves a purpose?
High-brow, low-brow, doesn't really matter if escapism is what you seek as a reader.
Many more interesting works still remain unappealing and 'difficult to understand', unless explained in a school setting (example Shakespeare, Dickens, George Orwell, Thomas Hardy, J. D. Salinger, D.H Lawrence, Jane Austen, Joseph Conrad).
Without being introduced to such novels and discussing them and what they mean then young and older adults alike may be missing out on an important part of their cultural heritage and need to (or should) look for an opportunity to keep themselves up to date.

User avatar
seahermit
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby seahermit » Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:40 am

I have no idea what motivated my writing (over thirty years ago!). I had been scribbling poems at times, before friends produced some interesting stuff and made me realise that I also had serious things to say. One thing led to another, the writing frequently threatened to take over my life and often I forgot about cups of tea or a bite to eat for numerous hours!! It's a compulsion, but immensely satisfying when a piece works out.

The last couple of years I have been slack with it, busy with other creative things - maybe I needed that break and "refresher". But I'm anxious to slip back into my favourite mode of being this year, have plans to complete a collection of stories, publish more satirical poetry and revisit the draft of a novel. Wish me luck, I'll need it!

From childhood I have always loved stories. I have never gone along with the view that fiction is "just a story" and therefore less relevant than non-fiction. Stories are drawn from the experiences, memories, sufferings of human beings and are therefore very much a mirror of Life. Great novels can be immensely meaningful to a reader, very powerful and initiate movements for change more effectively than any five-minute politician. Where does one start for examples ..? Uncle Tom's Cabin, Les Miserables, Doctor Zhivago, Oliver Twist, Grapes of Wrath, Gulag Archipelago ..

I love escapism too! Been addicted to Simenon's Maigret stories for years and I enjoy the "crossword puzzle" of an Agatha Christie novel.

User avatar
seahermit
Posts: 220
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby seahermit » Mon Jan 15, 2018 2:04 am

I really like these topics you are coming up with at the moment, Richard .. would like to see more of a "blogging" emphasis in the Forum and I think it would draw in more contributors from the local community (not many of us at present!). It would surely fulfil a need too? I have always been surprised that, despite all the literary and artistic talent in Hastings, there is very little by way of a forum/focal point/meeting place such as a community magazine or online blog site to serve as an outlet for local people - to discuss issues, chat, post their writing maybe, post anything! I know there are one or two newspapers and online sites but it all seems a bit fragmented and I don't think the papers are at all good or truly representative.

Like you, I have some time-consuming preoccupations at the moment .. but I may get somewhat suggestive to the Administrator later. He only has to tell me what to do with my ideas!

User avatar
Richard
Posts: 2245
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:36 pm

Re: Literary events

Postby Richard » Tue Jan 16, 2018 2:14 pm

MJ - I don't really know how a 'blog' works or could work in the forum, it sounds like an independent form of diary published on the net.

Regarding literary forms of expression, it may be the case that the the same sort of pleasure is derived from the creative process behind writing as in music and so-called painting, et al.
Creativity will find an outlet that better suits the medium that the creator is able to summon up, influenced and motivated by a plethora of ideas and thoughts drawn from life experience or purely the imagination, or inter-mixtures thereof.
I am more inclined to paint than to write but some people do both, or more and then the experience / effort is, no doubt, more open to creative cross-over than ever.
A literary discussion topic that may be of interest is one that encompasses several different forms of expression.
for example, the sharp-edged, melancholy verse of the poetry of Edith Sitwell (of aristocratic lineage) married with the musical accompaniment of William Walton's musical expression in 'Façade' is said to catch the spirit of the 1920s, and led to experiments with sound and rhythm that were unconventional, also the actual meaning of the poetry written by Sitwell, which was intriguing to read, was often declared as 'nonsense'.
Sitwell recited through a megaphone, protruding through a decorated screen, while Walton conducted an ensemble of six players in his accompanying music. Evelyn Waugh, Virginia Woolf and Noël Coward were among the audience, on occasion, the press was generally condemnatory.
Whether there is any viable connection between that experimental work and other forms like Jazz and pop music is another matter altogether and one that may produce further discussion.
Façade was later set into various ballets.


Return to “Hobbies, Leisure and Sports”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest