African Night 5th October

Conversation regarding Hastings attractions and events taking place in the area.
lizzie may
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Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2019 5:49 pm

African Night 5th October

Postby lizzie may » Thu Sep 12, 2019 6:09 pm

FREEDOM Project African Night - Hastings 5th October
FOR JUST A TENNER YOU CAN HAVE A CULTURAL EXPERIENCE, & HELP RELIEVE PERIOD POVERTY & SUFFERING OF HUNDREDS OF VULNERABLE CONGOLESE GIRLS, KEEPING THEM IN EDUCATION
Join us at our vibrant, authentic African night of culture - audience participation: 7-9.30pm, Sat 5th October (Cambridge Hall opposite ESK, Cambridge Road, Hastings TN34 1DJ):

SPICE IT UP African canope treats; GET THE FACTS short TED talk on life in the DRC
SEE SOME MOVES Congolese dancing, BYO 'bring your own' booze or drinks.
ART AUCTION BARGAINS take home colourful artworx, DRESS IN colourful or African clothes
FEEL THE RHYTHM African drumming circle led by Djembe-trained popular local drum-master, Alison Surridge - on the right in purple!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVBCnVKePio

PLEASE BOOK TICKETS IN ADVANCE FOR FOOD PLANNING. TEXT 07870-411076.
Organisers: charities, Loaf Project, & DRC partner Eben-Ezer International.

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Richard
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby Richard » Tue Sep 17, 2019 8:02 pm

I feel sorry for people affected by the killing tribes of Africa but unfortunately magic, superstition and witchcraft seem to rule the roost and of course politics and tribal chief warfare will manipulate local fears and beliefs which are totally beyond our control.

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seahermit
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby seahermit » Wed Sep 18, 2019 8:18 am

Not at all sure what this event is actually about. Some dancing but by Africans? In African style? And drumming. What is a TED talk and what is the DRC? It seems to be some kind of benefit event but by whom? And where is the Cambridge Hall? 20 years in Hastings and I have never heard of it.

I suppose the YouTube video tells you more but the post is so badly put together and uninformative that I am really not drawn to it.

cbe
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Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2014 7:29 pm

Re: African Night 5th October

Postby cbe » Wed Sep 18, 2019 8:58 am

DRC = Democratic Republic of Congo

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Richard
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby Richard » Wed Sep 18, 2019 9:59 pm

Asylum seekers are not allowed to claim benefits or work in the UK. If they are destitute and have no other means of supporting themselves, they can apply to receive asylum support. This is set at around £5.39 per day.
When a person is given refugee status, they have just 28 days to find accommodation and apply for mainstream benefits before they are evicted from asylum accommodation. Many refugees become homeless at this stage.

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seahermit
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby seahermit » Thu Sep 19, 2019 10:59 am

Very relevant. There will be hundreds of asylum seekers at an African music event.

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ColinL
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby ColinL » Thu Sep 19, 2019 3:13 pm

Just how many African asylum seekers do you think that there are in the Hastings area, and available, and wanting, to be queueing up for a gig in the town, Ms Seahermit? Surprisingly (perhaps to you) there may also be non-asylum seeking DRC and non DRC Africans in the area, along with indigenous Hastingers who want to be entertained by culture from another continent.

Despite your apparent difficulty to understand, it clearly says it is a benefit to keep girls in education in the Congo, it gives instructions as to how the venue can be located. Cambridge Hall is, from memory as a former resident, part of the old congregational church (I think that was the denomination) almost opposite the old post office. It also hosts performances for the Hastings Philharmonic Orchestra.

I applaud efforts of our young enterprising next generation, to see beyond their own environments and understand that very small events or assistance from the UK can result in huge benefits to every day lives of young people elsewhere. I contribute to Water for Kids, a charity that has small projects in schools in Africa by using and conserving rainwater and improving toilet sanitation. That also helps keep children, especially girls, in schools. Simple and effective

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seahermit
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby seahermit » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:00 am

I should have guessed that my quip might start ColinL off and give him an opportunity to fire off a few more rockets at me. Like putting match to touch-paper really!

I simply said it was a poorly constructed and uninformative post - which it is. Little info about the organisation behind the event etc. Though I am fully behind the affluent West doing its part in assisting poor and undeveloped countries of the world to move forward.

I am afraid I found the above reply to my post somewhat amusing for another reason - which Richard will know if he is sharp-eyed. Shhh ...!

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ColinL
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby ColinL » Fri Sep 20, 2019 12:28 pm

The original post was quite clear in what it was for, where it was, and included a little video as well

I am at a loss to understand what it is that you found so objectionable about the original post, and what you find so annoying that I questioned your request for the information that the posters had originally supplied to you. As many of your previous posts show, your comment was not a little 'quip' but a very focussed comment about people in our community who face discrimination. Do you have any view on the purpose of the charity or of Water for Kids that I posted about?

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Richard
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Re: African Night 5th October

Postby Richard » Sat Sep 21, 2019 11:41 am

We don't always appreciate the sheer magic of being able to turn a tap on or flush the loo.
Water is not 'on tap' in most African countries and small projects can make a big difference in educating about the dangers of contaminated water, potentially carrying many diseases, plus of course actually sourcing the water and distributing it according to needs and availability.
Simple facts about not allowing human waste to contaminate fresh water supplies and how to make other water safe that may carry larvae of mosquito's or snails - Malaria and river blindness?
Early human habitations were often built next to water sources, rivers would often serve as a crude form of natural sewage disposal.
However, human waste has also been used as irrigation and fertilizer of agricultural crops through history. That is fairly safe, despite sounding horrible but as long as people know what is possible and never to contaminate fresh drinking water with human waste we are on safer ground.

I can see the value in small projects of this nature but Lord seahermit possibly and myself to some greater extent probably, are a little cynical/weary of hearing how much of the large-scale aid given to African countries, however well-intentioned, often fails, owing to corrupt leaders or lack of foresight in planning. (Band-Aid Geldof and tractors to Africa that ran out of supplies or nobody knew how to repair).

Water For Kids sounds to be a good one to support as it is small scale, there are people on the ground to educate and a little aid can go a long way.
I will contribute to this charity if seahermit does likewise - that's my offer :D


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